Cyberpunk: Literature about this brave new on-line world

We all know that we can find information about digital journalism, digital television, digital schooling and courses of all kind, even movies about it (like David Fincher’s The Social Network or the recent The Fifth State about Wikileaks); but what about literature about this digital world?

In 2012 a trailer for Cyberpunk 2077 video game was launched. The game is part of Cyberpunk’s series, a collection of novels, card games and board games that derives from the original 1988 Cyberpunk 2020 role-playing game, which followed different stories told through a comicbook-based guide.

The name of the series comes after a sci-fi subgenre originated in the late 70’s. Plots often center on a conflict among hackers, artificial intelligence, and megacorporations; and tend to be set in a near-future Earth, focusing on a high-tech low-life in a post-industrial dystopia.

The first novel to depict cyberspace and combat within it was John M. Ford’s Web of Angels (1980), but it’s origins could be traced back to 1968 with Phillip K. Dick’s novel Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep?. The Cyberpunk’s elements are enhanced on the film adaptation Blade Runner, which Scott Ridley transformed in a pure Cyberpunk story, with an atmosphere inspired in Tokyo, oftenly believed to be definition for how a cyberpunk city looks like.

Tokyo: The cyberpunk city

Being so is no wonder that the genre had a deep influence in the Japanese culture, being very present on the manga and anime with titles such as Akira or Ghost In The Shell. As a comeback, the last one deeply influenced the Wazowski brothers for The Matrix trilogy.

 This genre also jumped to the music scene, with a large group of musicians that can be categorized as “Cyberpunk”, such as Atari Teenage RiotSigue Sigue Sputknik or the last italian electro sensation Cyberpunkers, this duo got as far as “creating” a suicidal social network for one of their videos:

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